The Prince of Orange


The Prince of Orange

The Price of Orange, a Major General in the British Army, and heir to the throne of the Netherlands, commanded the entire Anglo-Allied army until the Duke of Wellington’s arrival, and was thereafter second-in-command. This was a ‘diplomatic’ appointment rather than one on merit, as the twenty-three year old prince was in no manner the ideal deputy of Wellington; indeed, it has been said that he was incapable of managing a single battalion, a judgement which is perhaps a little harsh. It is true; however, that some of Wellington’s experienced peninsular staff would have been far better suited for this important appointment. The Prince’s command came to an abrupt end when he was wounded on 18th June.

To the Left shows the uniform worn by the Prince of Orange at Waterloo, taken from a portrait and from the actual garments. An unusual feature is the scabbard of his mameluke-hilted sabre, which was covered in red velvet, the hilt and scabbard-fittings being gilt. The simple horse-furniture, without shabraque, is shown in the contemporary portrait.


The Staff Officer

The staff officer is shown wearing the regulation uniform, modified for wear on campaign; in full dress, white breeches replaced the overalls, and the hat had an edging of white feathers, and a white plume. A painting of the Prince and staff at Quatre Bras shows an aide-de-camp wearing a bell-topped shako with black plume, a grey, knee-length, double-breasted frock-coat with red collar, grey overalls, and the customary orange sash.